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MILSPRAY’s VP of Administrative Operations, Chantel Robinson to Attend Science & Healthcare Networking Forum at Seton Hall University

Chantel Robinson, VP of Administrative Operations

Chantel Robinson,
VP of Administrative Operations

Chantel Robinson has years of leadership experience in marketing, project management and brand development. Since joining the company in 2011, she has increased MILSPRAY’s exposure within the Department of Defense while leading technology demonstrations at the Pentagon, the Army Rapid Equipping Force (REF), the US Marine Corps Expeditionary Forward Operating Base (Ex-FOB) and other high profile military events. Under her leadership, MILSPRAY™ secured its first contract with the US Army for corrosion prevention and control services and formed numerous teaming arrangements with strategic partners to pursue multiple IDIQ contracts.

In August 2014, Robinson was promoted to Vice President of Administrative Operations with responsibility for Human Resources, Marketing and Communications for MILSPRAY™. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Science in International Business from Seton Hall University.

Today, Robinson will be attending the Science & Healthcare Networking Forum from 4:30pm-6:30pm at Seton Hall University.

Chantel Robinson
Vice President of Administrative Operations
Cell Phone: (732) 492-5237
Office Phone: (732) 886-2223
chantelrobinson@milspray.com


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Winning With Women Wednesday – An Interview With the Lt. Governor of New Jersey, Kim Guadagno

An Interview With the Lt. Governor of NJKim Guadagno

Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno has been a lawyer for more than 32 years and an elected official for just about 10. She was born in Iowa but lived all around the country as her dad changed jobs almost 20 times before she went to college. After graduating from Ursinus College in Pennsylvania in 1980 and American University Law School in the District of Colombia in 1983, she first practiced law in New York City. In 1988, she landed her first job in public service as a federal prosecutor with the Organized Crime and Racketeering Strike Force in Brooklyn. After her marriage in 1991, Guadagno moved to her new husband’s home county of Monmouth in New Jersey, and began serving as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Newark. In Newark, she specialized in public corruption cases.

Lt. Governor Photo - Hi-Res 2015

Lieutenant Governor of NJ, Kim Guadagno

Next, Guadagno served as Assistant Attorney General in New Jersey, serving as the Deputy Director of the Division of Criminal Justice until 2001. Her first elected office was as Commissioner in her small town of Monmouth Beach as the head of Public Works from 2005 – 2007. In 2007, Guadagno became the first female Sheriff of Monmouth County. As Sheriff, she ran a 650 person law enforcement agency and earned a very rare five star accreditation for the institution. From 2001 to her election in 2009, Lt. Governor Guadagno also taught at Rutgers Law School-Newark.

Kim Guadagno was sworn in as New Jersey’s first Lieutenant Governor on January 19, 2010, and was re-elected to a second term on November 5, 2013. Lt. Governor Guadagno serves concurrently as New Jersey’s 33rd Secretary of State. She has been married for 24 years and has three sons.


1. Kim, I know our readers would love to know, in your own words, how did you arrive at becoming the first Lt. Governor and Secretary of State for New Jersey?

I felt I was uniquely qualified to do the job as a result of three decades as a lawyer and prosecutor; a manager of a law enforcement agency in the Attorney General’s office; and the leader of the multifaceted Office of Sheriff of Monmouth County. Since there had never been a Lieutenant Governor before, I was interested in the challenge.

I did not know then-candidate Chris Christie well when he asked me to run with him, but we were both Trenton outsiders and former federal prosecutors. I realized that, together, we could really make some significant and important changes for New Jersey. I accepted because I knew it was the best way that I could give back to my state. We had a very clear vision of what needed to be done and I have focused on areas that have been ignored by previous administrations: job creation, business retention, tax relief, and cutting red tape.

2. Can you please describe what your role as the Lt. Governor and Secretary of State embodies…What are your main responsibilities and duties?

My most important job of course has been serving as the acting governor over the last six years when the Governor is out of state. As Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of State, the largest part of my work is overseeing the New Jersey Partnership for Action (PFA), the State’s four-pronged comprehensive- and award winning if you don’t mind a little pat on the back- economic development strategy.

I have traveled the state from top to bottom visiting hundreds of companies and speaking to thousands of employers, putting more than half a million miles on the government truck (actually several trucks) over the years. I have given out my cell phone number to tens of thousands of people. The best part of my job has always been to speak to businesses one-on-one and to be able to fix a problem for the people who work at these companies and who, quite frankly, pay for the truck and pay my salary.

There is probably nothing more fun than having someone call me for help and having them spend the first 30 seconds of the call saying something like, “I never thought you would answer your own phone!” Hey, this is New Jersey. You don’t give out your cell phone number unless you expect people to use it!

I serve as Chair of both the Red Tape Review Commission, which is engaged in an ongoing review and reform of the State’s regulatory process, and the New Jersey Military Installation Growth and Development Task Force, which works to secure the long-term growth and viability of New Jersey’s military bases and U.S. Coast Guard installations.

Additionally, as Secretary of State, I serve as New Jersey’s chief election official, oversee promotion of the state’s $42 billion tourism industry, and administer programs related to the arts, culture, and history. Finally, I supervise the Division of Programs (including the Office of Faith Based Initiatives and the Center for Hispanic Research, Policy and Development) and the Governor’s Office of Volunteerism, including the State’s Americorps program and New Jersey’s Commission on National and Community Service.

And, to an audience of women, I like to joke: I get one salary and no pension.

3. Was it hard being a woman and climbing your way to the top to achieve your current position? If so, how did you overcome the challenges i.e. support from fellow co-workers, strong desire to succeed…? If not, have there been other women who have held your current position?

I like to emphasize that I was a lawyer doing what I love for decades, before I decided to serve my community in elected office. In 2007, I ran to become the first female Sheriff of Monmouth County. During that race, I was told that sheriffs don’t wear pink. What “they” said was that people expect their sheriff to wear a gun and a ten gallon hat – not high heels and certainly not pink – not today, or ever. Isn’t that just another way of saying women can’t be sheriffs? You know, even though Sheriffs don’t wear pink, I did win that election as the 75th Sheriff of Monmouth County. Any challenges I faced were overcome with hard work, study, collaboration, and common sense leadership. And I’m certain that the Governor asked me to run with him in 2009 because of my success in that election.

4. Have you mentored women throughout your career? If so, what are your three best tips for success?

As a mentor, if I can give young women the opportunity to discover what is important to them and the support to pursue that dream; they can take those lessons and forge their own path. There are a few pieces of advice I always give:

• Develop, maintain, and expand your circle of women colleagues, and, as author Anna Quinlan once said, “Reach as you rise.” You must pull others up along the way.

• Don’t play by the rule book others write — write your own. You know what needs to be done; you know your business best.

• Plan, but always write your life plans in pencil, because you’ll use the eraser far more than you think you will.

5. What career advice do you give younger women who are climbing the ladder of success and trying to manage life/work/balance?

Do not let others define you because of your gender, your race, where you were born or how much money you may have. If I had followed conventional wisdom, or listened to skeptics, I would not be doing the thing I love today for the state I love.

For those of you juggling family and work, know one day your kids will get it — even if that day is not here yet. I have three wonderful young men on their way or already engaged in great, satisfying careers. They survived. Guilt is not your friend. And remember — don’t put yourself last.

6. What were some moments when you felt treated differently because you’re a woman?

Certainly during the Sheriff’s race in 2007. One gentleman asked me how I could raise a family and work full time. I thought wow, this is the 21st century! But I answered his question patiently because I knew he was not the only one who wanted to know the answer: “I have a lot of help.”

7. More women than men earn college degrees, and increasingly, advanced degrees. Notably, they earn almost half of advanced business degrees. Yet, women only represent 16.9 percent of board directors at Fortune 500 companies. Do you think the conversation around women and leadership is just about power? Why or Why not?

New Jersey’s Partnership for Action, our highly successful economic development engine, is and has been led by women. The NJ/NY metro area is home to approximately 665,700 women-owned firms – the largest population in the US – and New Jersey’s more than 230,000 women-owned businesses employ about 259,000 people and see sales revenues exceeding $44 million annually. It’s clear women can do the job.

I don’t think the conversation is about power; it is about priorities. Often women put other things ahead of climbing the corporate ladder. We also often do not speak up for ourselves. We need to use our amazing ability to collaborate and leverage our obvious value to get a seat at the table in those board rooms.

8. What are important lessons around the topic of women and leadership for you?

I think the most important thing is to work for a world where gender isn’t part of the conversation– where we can celebrate a woman’s success simply because it is success, not because a woman has accomplished it.

9. Please tell me about your parents and how did they influence you? Were there any favorite expressions that were repeated around the table that have become words you live by today?

My mom and dad had a wonderful 5 decade marriage of give and take, sacrifice and love. I grew up debating with them whatever the topic of the day was – politics, war, abortion, and women’s rights. My mother often demanded evidence of our position – “what you assert without proof, I deny without proof.” As kids, we would sometimes just throw out a hot topic at dinner just to watch what would happen next. I often wonder how those debates would have gone today in the world of the internet. We learned to debate, but more importantly we learned how to end an argument as friends and family.

I loved the give and take of the often heated exchange which inevitably started at my Sunday dinner table. As a child, I moved almost 20 times or more before college, and that ability to debate gave me the confidence to speak up for myself in every new place we lived. So, I spoke up, and that also led me naturally to the law.

10. If you were to receive an award for, “Best At ____”. How would you fill in the blank and why?

I am best at moving forward and getting things done without focusing on my office, title or the other “trappings” of this job.

11. How do you hire?

My attitude is we work for the taxpayer, not the other way around. That’s why so many people have my personal cell number in New Jersey. I specifically look for staff members who agree with that vision. We work for you, and the day we forget that, should be our last day on the job.

12. What was the “Aha” moment or turning point in your life that had a direct impact on your career and leadership?

Perhaps I am dating myself, but I had a chance to see Justice Sandra Day O’Connor as she began her first term in my first year of law school in DC. She was the first woman member of the U.S. Supreme Court, and that confirmed for me that the law was my passion and that a woman could do or be anything.


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MILSPRAY’s VP of Administrative Operations, Chantel Robinson to Attend Veterans Job Fair in Toms River, NJ

Chantel Robinson, VP of Administrative Operations

Chantel Robinson,
VP of Administrative Operations

Chantel Robinson has years of leadership experience in marketing, project management and brand development. Since joining the company in 2011, she has increased MILSPRAY’s exposure within the Department of Defense while leading technology demonstrations at the Pentagon, the Army Rapid Equipping Force (REF), the US Marine Corps Expeditionary Forward Operating Base (Ex-FOB) and other high profile military events. Under her leadership, MILSPRAY™ secured its first contract with the US Army for corrosion prevention and control services and formed numerous teaming arrangements with strategic partners to pursue multiple IDIQ contracts.

In August 2014, Robinson was promoted to Vice President of Administrative Operations with responsibility for Human Resources, Marketing and Communications for MILSPRAY™. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Science in International Business from Seton Hall University.

Tomorrow, Robinson will be attending the Veterans Job Fair from 9:00am-2:00pm at the Elks Lodge in Toms River, NJ.

Chantel Robinson
Vice President of Administrative Operations
Cell Phone: (732) 492-5237
Office Phone: (732) 886-2223
chantelrobinson@milspray.com


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Motivational Monday: Be The Change You Wish To See

You must be the change you wish to see in the world.

Have you stumbled upon this quote before? Many of us at some point in time have come across a Mahatma Ghandi quote.

But have you ever known the back story behind one of them?

Recently, we came across an article written by Lolly Daskal, an Executive Coach and Speaker who gave her audience the story behind this quote and also a few tips of her own.


Among the hundreds of people were waiting to visit with Mahatma Gandhi were a mother and her young son. When it was their turn, the woman asked Gandhi to speak with her son about eating sugar.

Gandhi asked her to come back in two weeks and said he would talk to the boy then. She wondered why he didn’t just speak to her son when he was already there, but she complied with his request.

In two weeks they returned, and after waiting for a couple of hours, she was able to approach Gandhi once again.

Hearing her repeated request, Gandhi immediately spoke with the boy, who agreed to begin working to eliminate sweets. After thanking Gandhi for his wise and compassionate words, the mother asked him why he wanted them to return instead of offering his advice the first time.

To read the article in it’s entirety: Click Here


Do you have a quote you would like to share with us?

Be sure to use the hashtag #MotivationalMonday on Twitter for your chance to be retweeted on our timeline.

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Feature Friday: MILSPRAY™ Chemistry Intern Values Experience

Jessica ThomulkaIt’s Feature Friday and recently we had the chance to catch up with one of our Summer Chemistry Interns, Jessica Thomulka.

Jessica, was recently featured on Seton Hall University’s website and spoke about her internship here at MILSPRAY™. Click Here to Read More

Jessica stated, “The amount of chemistry I learned from my internship is immeasurable. The hands- on environment has taught me skills that I could have never learned in class or even in a teaching laboratory. At MILSPRAY™ I have had the opportunity to work with seasoned chemists and brilliant engineers who are eager to share their knowledge and practices. I have become more confident in myself and in my abilities.”

To find out more information about MILSPRAY™ internship and career opportunities: Click Here


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MILSPRAY™ Expands Presence in Pennsylvania

MILSPRAY™ announced today its expansion with a new office in Trevose, PA. The new office will support the growth of our sales organization and add numerous jobs to support our entry into the commercial sectors both domestically and internationally.

Our Vice President of Sales and New Business, Sirena Moore-Thomas, will lead this expansion. “We have an exceptionally talented and committed team in PA”, said Brian Feser, President and CEO of MILSPRAY™. “We are focused on strategically growing our business globally, investing in our employees and enhancing the local community.” “We will continue to build our team from the highly skilled and motivated workforce in Pennsylvania.”

The new office is located at One Neshaminy Interplex, Suite 105, Trevose, PA, 19053. Contact: Sirena Moore-Thomas, sirenathomas@milspray.com, (732) 552-3553.


About MILSPRAY™

Headquartered in Lakewood, NJ, MILSPRAY™ specializes in (1) Mobile Corrosion Prevention and Control Services for Vehicles and Equipment, (2) Deployable Renewable Energy Systems, (3) Vehicle Wash Systems, (4) Weapons Repair (5) Touch-up Paints and Specialty Coatings and 6) Applied Research and Development.
We provide our products, systems and services to commercial businesses, the Department of Defense (DOD), government agencies and law enforcement, domestically and internationally. These services and technologies are designed to extend the useful life of military vehicles, aircraft, ships, weapons and equipment. In addition, MILSPRAY™ is a developer and manufacturer of renewable energy systems for the military, disaster relief and commercial use.

MILSPRAY™ embraces the diversity of talent and perspective of our employees. We have created an atmosphere of inclusion where everyone has a voice and is empowered to perform at their greatest level regardless of our differences. Our total workforce is comprised of 47% minorities, 17% women and 34% veterans. Our executive management team is comprised of 50% women with 50% of our management team being service disabled veterans. By leveraging our unique talents, experiences and points of view, we can successfully deliver innovative solutions and value to our customers.

Contact:
Chantel Robinson, chantelrobinson@milspray.com, (732) 886-2223


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MILSPRAY™ Expands Business Development Team – Ken Fahrenfeld

Ken FahrenfeldKen Fahrenfeld joins MILSPRAY’s Business Development team as a Proposal Writer. In his new role, Fahrenfeld is responsible for providing corporate leadership in the areas of capture management, proposal writing and program management.

Fahrenfeld comes from a Program Management/Capture Lead background that includes over 13 years of leading several highly-visible Department of Defense engineering design, development, and production programs. He specializes in Proposal Management. In his previous role at BAE Systems, he served as Program Manager of the Multi-Information Distribution System Joint Tactical Radio System (MIDS JTRS).

“As our company continues to expand in the U.S. and internationally into both new and existing markets, our business development is at the center of our global growth strategy,” said Brian Feser, President and CEO of MILSPRAY™. “Ken’s years of experience in leading proposal management, driving program excellence and delivering results will be an integral part of our success moving forward.”

Ken holds a Bachelor of the Arts in Mass Communications from the University of Scranton, Scranton, PA.


About MILSPRAY™

Headquartered in Lakewood, NJ, MILSPRAY™ specializes in (1) Mobile Corrosion Prevention and Control Services for Vehicles and Equipment, (2) Deployable Renewable Energy Systems, (3) Vehicle Wash Systems, (4) Weapons Repair (5) Touch-up Paints and Specialty Coatings and 6) Applied Research and Development.

We provide our products, systems and services to commercial businesses, the Department of Defense (DOD), government agencies and law enforcement, domestically and internationally. These services and technologies are designed to extend the useful life of military vehicles, aircraft, ships, weapons and equipment. In addition, MILSPRAY™ is a developer and manufacturer of renewable energy systems for the military, disaster relief and commercial use.

MILSPRAY™ embraces the diversity of talent and perspective of our employees. We have created an atmosphere of inclusion where everyone has a voice and is empowered to perform at their greatest level regardless of our differences. Our total workforce is comprised of 47% minorities, 17% women and 34% veterans. Our executive management team is comprised of 50% women with 50% of our management team being service disabled veterans. By leveraging our unique talents, experiences and points of view, we can successfully deliver innovative solutions and value to our customers.

Contact:
Chantel Robinson, chantelrobinson@milspray.com, (732) 886-2223


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Winning With Women Wednesday: An Interview With Ginger Wierzbanowski, VP Business Development, ISR Division, Northrop Grumman Corporation

An Interview With Ginger WierzbanowskiGood morning and welcome to another Winning With Women Wednesday. This past week we had the incredible opportunity to interview, Ginger Wierzbanowski, Vice President, Business Development, ISR Division, for the Northrop Grumman Corporation. Within her interview she speaks of her 20+ years as a USAF veteran and gives her three best tips for success for women looking to succeed within their professional careers.

Get To Know Ginger:Wierzbanowki_Ginger

Name: Ginger Wierzbanowski
Education: Bachelor’s degree in Russian-East European studies from the University of Northern Colorado and Master’s degrees in Russian-East European studies and Russian language from Florida State University.
Organization(s): Northrop Grumman Corporation
Position: Vice President, Business Development, ISR Division
Time with the organization: 5 years
Organization headquarters: Falls Church, Va.


1. Ginger, please share with us what drew you to work for Northrop Grumman?

As a USAF veteran of 20+ years, a military spouse, and more recently, 3+ years on the Joint Staff as a Civil servant …I am passionate about serving our country and giving back. When I decided to transition into the private sector, Northrop Grumman seemed like a natural fit because it serves the Defense and Intelligence Sectors.

2. Could you please describe what your current position as the Vice President, ISR Division for Northrop Grumman entails?

I serve as Vice President of Business Development for Northrop Grumman’s Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) division. I am responsible for global business growth for the entire ISR division portfolio. I lead tactical strategy discussions with key stakeholders, qualify our business pipeline, and prioritize the personnel and financial resources required for key pursuits. I manage the plan for future business across all market segments and coordinate all growth activities across the division’s leadership team.

3. What is Northrop Grumman’s mission/goal regarding women and diversity in the workplace?

Northrop Grumman is a committed champion of women and diversity and makes it a priority to enhance inclusion across the enterprise. Whether that’s in our employee resource groups or our heritage events, the company strives to develop a sense of community and empowerment by enabling networking, providing a support system and mentoring opportunities to facilitate career growth and development of leadership skills and community outreach. When I first looked at the NGC web site…I was really excited to see how many women hold key leadership positions throughout the company, both in core business areas and functional organizations.

4. Was it hard being a woman and climbing your way to the top to achieve your current position? If so, how did you overcome the challenges i.e. support from fellow co-workers, strong desire to succeed…? If not, have there been other women who have held your current position?

When I joined the Air Force in 1986, less than 10% of the Force was women; today that percentage has almost doubled. I knew the women that had come before me had fought hard to be accepted as soldiers/airmen and be recognized as assets to the fighting force…that understanding drove me and my peers to constantly overachieve, to pave the way for those that followed in our footsteps.

5. Have you mentored women throughout your career? If so, what are your three best tips for success?

Yes, I have mentored many women. I’d say the 3 things that are most important are….1) be technically strong in and passionate about whatever path you choose, 2) spend time on building your internal and external network, 3) always make time to help, enable and empower others.

6. What career advice do you give younger women who are climbing the ladder of success and trying to manage life/work/balance?

Be gentle on yourself. There are days when you have to be 100% work focused and days where your family must be the priority…it’s more of a juggling act…it will never be a perfect balance. Create an extended network in your neighborhood, in your workplace of people who can step in to help you keep all the “balls in the air”. Some of my day to day juggling acts could be fodder for a sitcom…but it really does work.

7. Were there ever some moments when you felt treated differently because you’re a woman?

Early on, most definitely, but I was taught to always communicate with someone when they were doing something that was inappropriate. Most of the time, the person just did not understand the impact or consequences of their actions. I took the opportunity to teach and to fix the behavior.

8. More women than men earn college degrees, and increasingly, advanced degrees. Notably, they earn almost half of advanced business degrees. Yet, women only represent 16.9 percent of board directors at Fortune 500 companies. Do you think the conversation around women and leadership is just about power? Why or Why not?

No I don’t think it’s about power. I do see an increased recognition of the need for diversity…diversity of thought, background, experiences and I think this realization will enable more women to have more opportunities at senior levels. The gap between men’s and women’s advancement to senior positions has endured, despite increasing numbers of women with credentials and experience to assume top roles and despite the efforts of many organizations to develop their high-potential female employees.

9. What are important lessons around the topic of women and leadership for you?

I spend a lot of time talking about personal initiative and self-awareness to the women I lead and mentor. For example, many women struggle to self-sell, or to self-identify themselves as the right candidate for a job opening/opportunity. I look for the right opportunities to let decision makers and leaders see my team shine, and encourage those I mentor or lead to take advantage of cross-organizational teams and tasks to enable more people at all levels to personally view their strengths.

10. What’s unusual about the culture at Northrop Grumman?

I would say something that makes us unique is our significant focus on supporting our troops and veterans. As a global security company with many DoD contracts, this would seem commonplace, but I think Northrop Grumman goes the extra mile to design and implement solutions and strategies for this community. For example, we have a program called Operation IMPACT where we focus on assisting severely wounded service members as they transition from the military to a private-sector career. The program provides wounded service members with one-on-one personalized assistance in identifying potential job opportunities as well as marketing their skills to hiring managers and recruiters inside and outside our company. I have been the advocate for this program and for the service members we hire and I’m incredibly proud that Northrop has taken the lead with this program.

11. If you were to receive an award for, “Best At ____”. How would you fill in the blank and why?

I would probably receive an award for “Best at connecting the Dots…or Best non-redundant node”. I have the ability to look at a specific research or technology project and see many ways it can be used…not just the targeted use case. I do the same thing with talent or processes…I easily see how something/someone can be evolved or applied to a myriad of things.

12. How do you hire?

I look for people that are extremely competent and driven, but also those that have very strong inter-personal skills. I look for new team mates to possess the following traits: strong passion, empathy, transparency, but most of all…someone who cares deeply about the mission we support (protecting the national security of the United States). Our mission gives our work meaning and a moral motivation.

13. What was the “Aha” moment or turning point in your life that had a direct impact on your career and leadership?

A recent example…a little over 3 years ago, shortly after joining Northrop Grumman, I was introduced to the leader of a User Experience (UX) team. This manager was buried in an organization, in Huntsville and had an amazing team of Software Engineers, Graphic artists, Mathematician’s and Illustrators…a team you’d expect to find at Apple or Google. After he gave me a presentation on some UX work he’d been doing on behalf of the Army, I was able to see a much broader application for his team and their ability to really get at the heart of customer needs and requirements. I used my network and called across the company to help get the UX or User Centered Design integrated into our everyday captures, proposals and ongoing programs. It took about a year for it to start bearing fruit, and even longer for the larger population to see the intrinsic benefit of a User Centered approach. Today, the bulk of our company sees the value and is a Defense Industry leader in applying UX. As far as my career and leadership…it made me realize how much and how many people I could positively impact, even in a large company. It also made people realize…. that we can change our company if we work together.

14. What is something you would be doing if you had just one more hour to incorporate into every day?

I would spend more time with our junior talent…they need to see it’s okay to lean forward, challenge the status quo and they need to be valued and connected to the people fabric of our company.